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505th Command and Control Wing News

Smith takes command of 84th RADES

  • Published
  • By Deb Henley, 505th Command and Control Wing Public Affairs

Lt. Col. Ryan Smith took command of the 84th Radar Evaluation Squadron from Lt. Col. Douglas Boytim during a change of command ceremony at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, June 7.

The change of command is a military tradition, formally transferring a unit’s authority and responsibility from one commander to another.  Col. James Fields, 505th Test & Training Group commander, Hurlburt Field, Florida, presided over the ceremony, noting the RADES’ importance in homeland security.

“The 84th Radar Evaluation Squadron’s mission ensures Air Defense Sectors and NORAD [North American Aerospace Defense Command] delivers airspace sovereignty throughout North America and Hawaii.  Your combined work with the Department of Homeland Security and the FAA [Federal Aviation Administration] ensures uninterrupted air surveillance in support of the joint homeland defense mission,” stated Fields. “This unit has excelled under Lt. Col. Boytim’s leadership and steadfast guidance, and Lt. Col. Smith is the forward-thinking leader that the RADES needs to carry the torch into these historic times.”

Before relinquishing command, Boytim thanked the men and women of the 84th RADES who had an impact during his time in command.

“To the professionals from the 84th RADES, your dedication to the mission these last two years has been tremendous; thank you. I will always cherish the excitement and commitment you bring every day. Use that motivation to build future leaders of the Air Force,” said Boytim.

“From assisting with aircraft mishap and recovery efforts, multi-million-dollar radar system upgrades, posturing software development for future sensors, and tracking and identifying foreign spy balloons, the always-find-an-answer attitude of the RADES will sustain it long into the future,” said Boytim. 

Before relinquishing command, Boytim concluded, “Being recognized as the ACC [Air Combat Command] nominee for the Department of Defense Chief Information Officer Award and Headquarters Air Force RAWS [Remote Automatic Weather Stations] Lima Site 85 winners is a testament to the work you do. It has been an honor to serve as your commander, and it will be bittersweet moving on in my career.”

Boytim’s next command will be of the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps, Detachment 620, at Bowling Green State University; he will also serve as the chair and professor of Aerospace Studies.

As we look to the future and optimize for Great Power Competition, C2 systems and sensors will change, but our mission will not. We will continue to provide exceptional sensor evaluation and analysis, agile software development, support to the Air Defense Sectors, and secure data centers. Technological advances and the pacing threat will drive increased demand for our services, and we stand ready to deliver.”
Lt. Col. Ryan, 84th Radar Evaluation Squadron commander

The 84th RADES sets the standard for sensor coverage prediction and depiction. It also provides data analysis and unique radar forensics to support search and rescue missions and aircraft mishap investigations. Squadron members ensure controllers have reliable and accurate sensor information for day-to-day operations, contingencies, and specialized activities such as counter-narcotics and search and rescue. Armed with technical experts, cyber operators, radar maintainers, specially trained surveyors, and four operating locations at NORAD Air Defense Sectors, the 84th RADES is a major contributor to all facets of air detection, air sovereignty, and command and control. In addition, the squadron conducts radar obstruction analysis, including wind farm evaluations, radar coverage studies, and diagrams supporting the FAA and other DOD entities.

As the commander, Smith will lead the 96-member squadron and four operating locations responsible for monitoring, evaluating, optimizing, and integrating fixed and mobile long-range radars for the DOD and federal aviation and defense communities.

The official changing of command and passing of the guidon is a tradition dating back to 1775, which allows unit members to officially recognize the authority of the incoming commander and honor the service of the outgoing commander.

Addressing RADES personnel for the first time as their commander, Smith said, “It’s an honor to be given the opportunity to take command of this professional and dedicated team of experts who contribute to our national defense every day. Each member of this squadron brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise unmatched by any other unit in the Air Force.”

Smith concluded, “As we look to the future and optimize for Great Power Competition, C2 systems and sensors will change, but our mission will not. We will continue to provide exceptional sensor evaluation and analysis, agile software development, support to the Air Defense Sectors, and secure data centers. Technological advances and the pacing threat will drive increased demand for our services, and we stand ready to deliver.”

The 84th RADES at Hill AFB, Utah, reports to the 505th TTG, assigned to the 505th Command and Control Wing; both are headquartered at Hurlburt Field, Florida.

 

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Smith takes command of 84th RADES

  • Published
  • By Deb Henley, 505th Command and Control Wing Public Affairs

Lt. Col. Ryan Smith took command of the 84th Radar Evaluation Squadron from Lt. Col. Douglas Boytim during a change of command ceremony at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, June 7.

The change of command is a military tradition, formally transferring a unit’s authority and responsibility from one commander to another.  Col. James Fields, 505th Test & Training Group commander, Hurlburt Field, Florida, presided over the ceremony, noting the RADES’ importance in homeland security.

“The 84th Radar Evaluation Squadron’s mission ensures Air Defense Sectors and NORAD [North American Aerospace Defense Command] delivers airspace sovereignty throughout North America and Hawaii.  Your combined work with the Department of Homeland Security and the FAA [Federal Aviation Administration] ensures uninterrupted air surveillance in support of the joint homeland defense mission,” stated Fields. “This unit has excelled under Lt. Col. Boytim’s leadership and steadfast guidance, and Lt. Col. Smith is the forward-thinking leader that the RADES needs to carry the torch into these historic times.”

Before relinquishing command, Boytim thanked the men and women of the 84th RADES who had an impact during his time in command.

“To the professionals from the 84th RADES, your dedication to the mission these last two years has been tremendous; thank you. I will always cherish the excitement and commitment you bring every day. Use that motivation to build future leaders of the Air Force,” said Boytim.

“From assisting with aircraft mishap and recovery efforts, multi-million-dollar radar system upgrades, posturing software development for future sensors, and tracking and identifying foreign spy balloons, the always-find-an-answer attitude of the RADES will sustain it long into the future,” said Boytim. 

Before relinquishing command, Boytim concluded, “Being recognized as the ACC [Air Combat Command] nominee for the Department of Defense Chief Information Officer Award and Headquarters Air Force RAWS [Remote Automatic Weather Stations] Lima Site 85 winners is a testament to the work you do. It has been an honor to serve as your commander, and it will be bittersweet moving on in my career.”

Boytim’s next command will be of the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps, Detachment 620, at Bowling Green State University; he will also serve as the chair and professor of Aerospace Studies.

As we look to the future and optimize for Great Power Competition, C2 systems and sensors will change, but our mission will not. We will continue to provide exceptional sensor evaluation and analysis, agile software development, support to the Air Defense Sectors, and secure data centers. Technological advances and the pacing threat will drive increased demand for our services, and we stand ready to deliver.”
Lt. Col. Ryan, 84th Radar Evaluation Squadron commander

The 84th RADES sets the standard for sensor coverage prediction and depiction. It also provides data analysis and unique radar forensics to support search and rescue missions and aircraft mishap investigations. Squadron members ensure controllers have reliable and accurate sensor information for day-to-day operations, contingencies, and specialized activities such as counter-narcotics and search and rescue. Armed with technical experts, cyber operators, radar maintainers, specially trained surveyors, and four operating locations at NORAD Air Defense Sectors, the 84th RADES is a major contributor to all facets of air detection, air sovereignty, and command and control. In addition, the squadron conducts radar obstruction analysis, including wind farm evaluations, radar coverage studies, and diagrams supporting the FAA and other DOD entities.

As the commander, Smith will lead the 96-member squadron and four operating locations responsible for monitoring, evaluating, optimizing, and integrating fixed and mobile long-range radars for the DOD and federal aviation and defense communities.

The official changing of command and passing of the guidon is a tradition dating back to 1775, which allows unit members to officially recognize the authority of the incoming commander and honor the service of the outgoing commander.

Addressing RADES personnel for the first time as their commander, Smith said, “It’s an honor to be given the opportunity to take command of this professional and dedicated team of experts who contribute to our national defense every day. Each member of this squadron brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise unmatched by any other unit in the Air Force.”

Smith concluded, “As we look to the future and optimize for Great Power Competition, C2 systems and sensors will change, but our mission will not. We will continue to provide exceptional sensor evaluation and analysis, agile software development, support to the Air Defense Sectors, and secure data centers. Technological advances and the pacing threat will drive increased demand for our services, and we stand ready to deliver.”

The 84th RADES at Hill AFB, Utah, reports to the 505th TTG, assigned to the 505th Command and Control Wing; both are headquartered at Hurlburt Field, Florida.